Production and Consumption

As consumers, it is easy to overlook where our products come from. Indeed, we are often blissfully unaware of the processes through which they are created, the number of resources they consume, and the methods involved in bringing them to our doorsteps. The reality is, however, that our ecological footprint is heavily dependent on what we are consuming.
For instance, water is the most consumed of our natural resources. Manufacturing processes, irrigation methods, and aquifers responsible for cattle feeding are all examples of processes that draw heavily on available freshwater. Shockingly, just 1kg of beef requires 15,415 litres of water. With this kind of data in mind, it is easy to see how water reserves are being depleted far faster than nature can replenish them. In this way, considering water conservation methods such as rainwater harvesting, greywater recycling, and switching from soil-based farming to hydroponics will help to preserve freshwater resources.
Similarly, promoting and supporting industries that promote efficient use of resources and have small ecological footprints would emphasise the importance of responsible consumption around the world. We have consumed more natural resources than ever in the last 50 years alone. Therefore, it is essential that we take initiatives to make everyone around us aware of being responsible in both producing and consuming these resources. Responsible consumerism, when practised by whole societies, will have a huge measurable impact on promoting sustainable lifestyles.
Production and Consumption
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